An introduction to the marijuana substance as a part of american culture

The Pure Food and Drug Act was passed by Congress in and was a landmark piece of legislation that created a list of intoxicating ingredients that were required to be mentioned on the label of the products they were in.

A hundred years later, alcohol consumption is no longer associated with unruly Negroes and their white ethnic enablers. Eventually, these plants growing wild with the sun shining down became the potent THC producing plants we know today as marijuana.

From Common Medicine to Schedule I Controlled Substance Around latethe Eighteenth Amendment was repealed and alcohol prohibition was a thing of the past — the government had finally admitted that they were not going to be able to outlaw alcohol entirely, so it was better to try and regulate it instead.

Part 3: A History of Cannabis and Prohibition

Prohibition of cannabis has a much longer history and many different factors play into where we stand today. The First Attempts at Regulation in the States Shortly before the Mexican Revolution got started, the United States Federal Government had decided to take their first crack at regulation of marijuana and other controlled substances.

The plant would be grown on big corporate farms, perhaps supported with unneeded federal subsidies and occasionally marred by scandals regarding exploitation of undocumented immigrant farm workers. People in the marijuana industry would wear suits, work in offices, donate to the Club for Growth and work with the tobacco industry to lobby against clean air restrictions.

The refugees who came to America brought with them, like so many before, their language, culture and customs — one of which was smoking marijuana or mota.

However, the findings of The Schafer Commission was that marijuana should not be Schedule I — they actually doubted whether or not it should be a part of the Controlled Substances Act at all! Rather than An introduction to the marijuana substance as a part of american culture off, the plants adapted, becoming hermaphroditic, allowing them to pollinate and continue to thrive.

We already have something of a prior example with alcohol and prohibition. A year later in El Paso, Texas passed the first city ordinance that banned the sale and possession of cannabis.

It was during this timeframe that things took the biggest downturn — during public hearings people would make claims that those who used marijuana became extremely violent and that its use made minorities seek sexual encounters with white women.

That reaction, that instinct within so many of us, is the reason that prohibition has failed so miserably. Almost a decade after the introduction of alcohol prohibition, Congress passed another law in called the Narcotic Farm Act. The American Medical Association suggested that perhaps cannabis should be scheduled under The Harrison Act instead — but that suggestion was overlooked and the Marihuana Tax Act was passed regardless of the AMAs protest.

Less than 10 years later, the federal government introduced The Harrison Act ofwhich gave them control over all narcotics. Incannabis manages to escape the Eighteenth Amendment, which outlawed alcohol and started the nearly 14 years of alcohol prohibition.

At one point, cannabis generally in the form of edibles or hashish was something used by the more affluent — but that all changed in a couple of decades.

The Marihuana Tax Act remained in place for many years — until years passed and hemp and medical cannabis became used less and less. Once one of the most commonly used medicines around, with a centuries old reputation, was made to look demonic to outsiders in less than twenty years.

It started with the Mexican Revolution During colonial times, hemp plants were planted from Chile to Alta California; these plants were eventually abandoned.

If regulation was the safe and smart approach for alcohol, why is it not the same for marijuana? At this point in history there was still cocaine in Coca-Cola and you could purchase heroin at Sears — everything was legal.

The Reefer Madness film depicted what could happen when high school students are pushed to try their first marijuana cigarettes.

It was because it was so plentiful and the high you got left you without a hangover, unlike alcohol, that it became such a popular intoxicant among the poorer class of Mexico. When Big Cannabis is marketing its product, it will take the path of far less resistance: This was the first law that made it illegal for non-medical consumers to possess opiates and cocaine.

How Would Legalizing Marijuana Change American Culture?

Inthe famous propaganda film Reefer Madness was released, instilling fear in those who had no idea that marijuana was the same as the cannabis tincture in their medicine cabinets. The peculiar result is a largely left-wing movement fighting hard alongside some corporate billionaires to create a multinational corporation and a largely conservative movement fighting to stop the advance of capitalism and the private sector.

While the lower class would say that they smoked marijuana as a way to cope with the everyday hardships of living, the more affluent of the country would instead blame the plant for their situation.

Alcohol prohibition lasted less than 15 years — yet here we are, decades into marijuana prohibition and people are still growing it in their basements and selling it on the black market.

The Temperance movement was mostly made up of Protestant denominations, whose opposition to alcohol consumption was laden with racist, anti-Catholic and anti-immigrant stereotypes. The president can hold a "beer summit. Alcohol prohibition was repealed only three years before the propaganda film that would change the course of marijuana in the United States for many years to come.

A quick mention, as with my previous articles — I will have sources linked throughout this article, but a lot of the information was obtained from the book Smoke Signalsby Martin A. It was around this same time, however, that the negative reputation surrounding marijuana use started to grow — and it grew rapidly due to the over-exaggerated horrors that were being spread around the country.

Pot will be sold as a vehicle of youthfulness and rebellion, a now totally legal!At this point, in part 1 and part 2 of this history series, we’ve taken a look at cannabis’ journey around the globe and the role of cannabis in early American culture.

Now it’s time to explore the Reefer Madness Era, when cannabis went from an accepted medicine to a substance that could cause men to lose their sanity in the eyes of the American people. Marijuana is something many Americans know about—to one degree or another. (By one government estimate, percent of the population admitted to using marijuana in ).

It's part of American history, culture and our economy. According to the NIDA, Marijuana is a substance that has become very much a part of American culture.

Its use has been increasing among young people since The federal government considers marijuana to have no medicinal uses and a. Jul 26,  · Cannabis would seen as a product to be marketed and sold just as is tobacco.

People in the marijuana industry would wear suits, work in offices, donate to the Club for Growth and work with the tobacco industry to lobby against clean air restrictions. Legalizing Marijuana in the United States Jennifer Wilkins English Composition I Engl July 21, Bertha Webster Legalizing Marijuana in the United States Introduction Marijuana is a substance that has become very much a part of American culture.

Marijuana is a substance that has become very much a part of American culture; many college students have either used it occasionally or regularly. - Legalization of Marijuana This essay has problems with formatting Marijuana is a substance that has become very much a part of American culture.

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An introduction to the marijuana substance as a part of american culture
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